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how to stop perseverating on a subject...

I don't know...my son switches back and forth with things.  The other day he acted like he was going to die if he couldn't wear his Superman shirt and he was pointing out everything Superman when we were at the store. 

This morning we were watching the news, and for some reason they showed a fast clip of the Teletubbies and that got him rolling with the Telletubbie stuff.  He was pretending that his waffle was "Tubbie Toast".  Which annoys his father and me. 

we don't have this particular problem...
my son gets " hooked" on a certain video and then wants to watch it every day, sometimes more than once a day for a while, and then something happens that changes it.
But he doesn't talk conversationally all that much, so maybe that's why we aren't seeing it so much in his speech?



I think it would be good to stress how others have other interests too, and how it's nice to learn about other things as well , " Bobby likes cars, lets ask him about that" etc - just so they learn socially that it's polite to have others take their turn talking or playing with what they like as well.
Maybe if you're reading a book about castles, or buses you could point out other things in the story that are different each time. The horses on one page...what can we learn about horses? ask questions about different things? anything to encourage them to broaden the  horizen a bit. ?

With any obsessive or " different" behavior I'm always torn about how to deal with it. Do I try to STOP my son from jumping or flapping his hands? Right now he has no idea hes doing something NOT normal, and he's not shy about it at all. I don't want to make him selfconcious....
and then again...what if he were doing this as a teenager? wouldn't I want him to learn to curb it?
I just don't know how to deal with this stuff as far as stopping it or discouraging it?
I don't know if that is a bad idea, or a good idea........

I guess I set limits on how much time he can perseverate. Maybe that sounds mean, but when he does this it turns into a downward  spiral. That being said, I have let him do way too much this last week and I can see it in his behavior and his attitude. I am getting ready for a garage sale and haven't been keeping on top of keeping him "tuned in". I do try to have him help me clean off the toys - we have that Pampers Clean and Play (I think that's what it's called) and it is non-toxic. He loves spraying that. I've also been having him help me make lots of zucchini bread/cakes/muffins etc. He LOVES doing this - this is the first time he's enjoyed helping cook/bake. But, he helped plant the zucchini, water it and helped with weeding as well. Daddy has let him pick the zucchini also and ds is SO proud to come in with an armful. I am baking and freezing and we will have a bake sale with the garage sale stuff as well as there is NO WAY we can eat all the zucchini stuff I have made. They have picked about 16 zucchini so far - and trust me, that is a LOT of bread! And I've only used about 8 so far...

Anyway, also to have a visual schedule as to what you are going to do when during the day - and schedule some "free time" in for him as well. Then he can choose to perseverate. My ds is very social and wants to be around other people so I can tell him that if he wants to do the perseverating, he needs to go to his room. He occasionally will choose this - and then I know he really needs to do it - but most of the time he will choose to be with us and then I try to engage him in an activity. He is going to another all-day camp next week, so I am hopeful that that will help him re-engage more - the last one certainly did! It was total structure and it totally wore him out. And he had a blast! So, I'm trying not to worry too much about letting him go more this week as I know next week he will be getting back in to the real world. I don't totally let him go by any means, but more than I usually do. I think limits are good - they need to learn that they can't do this behavior all the time and the more they perseverate, the less social interactions they will have. My son does some scripting as well (moreso this week!) from Little Einsteins...

Wow, my son perseverates about the same topics too.  He is obsessed with my mother-in-laws green car and her garage.  He is also constantly telling me that he wants to visit his cousin in California and exactly what he'll do--take the plane, ring the doorbell, open the door etc.  He also does scripting and knows whaty moose-a-moose says between shows on Noggin and will yell it out at the top of his lungs.  I was hoping that when he did start to talk that he would be more conversational but hopefully that will come in time--I can see it won't be easy.Okay....I am sure this topic has been mulled over many...many...many times...but with new people on the board and my son's new "phases"...I thought I would toss it back out there again....(this hasn't been an issue for me until the last month or so)...

My son has become very verbal recently..it is like something clicked and he is talking all of the time....(still is not NT...don't want to give the wrong impression but markedly different than 2 months ago)....Anyway...with this newfound ability to communicate better...we are finding out more about what he is thinking about (because he is telling us)...my son is FIXATED on castles....it is the first thing he talks about when he wakes up and the last thing he talks about when he goes to bed after the lights are turned off...

playdates come over and he wants to only play with his existing castle and he could care less what anyone else wants to do (we had to take the castle away during playdates because it was out of control and then he was putting shoe boxes together and using plastic animals to be the castle and knights)...

after someone says hello, he will say "hello. I am getting a black and silver lego castle for Christmas"


 and I thought this might be a crazy phase when one morning he said "can I have a Christmas tree?" (instead of the usual comments about getting a lego castle)...I asked him what would you do with an xmas tree and he said "I want a Christmas tree so that santa can come and bring me a black and silver lego castle with knights and dragons"....

And there you have it...castle on the brain morning, noon, and night (err...Knight rather - lol)...

What I want to know is ...how do you all handle this...ignore, redirect, go with it...we have limited his existing "castle toys" to only when he is doing ABA now (because it is a huge motivator)...and I don't think he is old enough or ready for some type of cue from me that he is talking about something too much (I read that it is a common practice for therapists, teachers and parents to set off a vibrating watch or pager to  let a kiddo know that they need to stop and change topics without actually interfering directly with the interaction that is currently going on...we are actually contemplating using the watch for other behaviors with my son)....

this is a very new issue for us because he is so much more chatty than before...

Any ideas what to do with a 4.5 yr old that won't stop talking or thinking about one particular topic?? or is this out of my hands (I can't control his thoughts)
Welcome to the club. My 13 year old, who has been socialized since infancy, still obsesses over certain topics, notably Mario Brothers Videogames. No, other kids DONT want to only talk about that, especially at 13. On the bright side, he really HAS learned to talk about what other people do. He may space out and maybe walk away after he gets bored (which doesn't take long), but he's still lots better. It's part of ASD, imo.

Both of my children do this, and one is moderately asd, and the other is HF. My younger one has a new obsession which is ceiling fans. Over the past week or so he hasn't been responding to me much, so when he got home from daycamp I tried something. I put the word "fan" in front of a few questions I was asking and amazingly enough he answered me. When I talked to him without the word he was just totally ignoring me.

The reason I mention this is that I think this is just something typical of Autism. I am not sure if you can really control it, but it does occur often. One thing I did do with my older son was to give him a point on a chart each day everytime he would mention his obsession less than 5 times. It did work really well, until he saved up enough points to get what he wanted (bionicles of course!) and then he was right back at it.  I would love to just one day talk with the boys about the weather or something different, but they always seem to revert back to their favorite things. Sometimes I just can't handle anymore and then I say "ok, enough talking about buses. Mikey can talk about buses, but Mommy doesn't want to about them anymore today." lol

Ours is Thomas trains - and I have no one to blame but myself, I introduced the first video.  I made the mistake on Friday of telling him that today he'd be going to speech camp and if he had a good day and could remain calm with the other kids around him he'd get a new train piece...every day since then he was asking to get his shoes so we could go to the store and buy the train.  He did finally get that he had to wait when I told him 2 more night nights - and he can count that down so he knew after camp today that there was a trip to Target for him (and he did do GREAT at the camp, definitely earned the train)...but that's about all he wants to talk about.My son who just turned 11 is obsessed with Timmy Turner (the kid from The Fairly Odd Parents).  When he's in the bathroom i can hear him scripting some lines from this show.  If it's not one thing he's obsessing about, it's another.  I just go with the flow.  What else can we do?  We went over my girlfriend's house this past weekend who also has a son.  My son just wanted to watch The Fairly Odd Parents and completely ignored that poor kid.   I'm hoping that the older he get's he'll be more aware and not do something like this at someone elses house.  Or maybe not?
 

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