States with Free therapies | Autism PDD
Home of Autism-PDD.net To Message Boards Site Map Free Autism Seminars

States with Free therapies

Some states may differ in name.  Some call it Katy Beckett waver.  Free therapies 19-22+ hours a week (differs from state) NOT based on income.  Idaho has it.  Anyone know what other states have it?  Norway mom, do you have a list of states that offer this (understanding rules and hours vary) without having to go onto every states "state" page to investigate?  I would love a list or people to comment if there state is one of them.  Thanks!We have been using the TEFRA option for my son. We live in MN. How much
you pay depends on income and there is a lot of paper work to get TEFRA.
On the other hand, it allowed us to get 35 hours a week of PCA service. We
don't use all the hours, since he is in therapy from 8:30-4:30, but it is
certainly nice to have. We just got our renewal for the next 4 years, so once
you are in the system, the paper work subsides.
Harriet

Thanks for cracking that nut!!!

You're lucky I saw this topic, because I've been very inactive on the forum lately.  You gave me a real tough nut to crack, but I think I figured it out.

First off, a short explanation for those unfamiliar with Katie Beckett:

"Called the TEFRA (Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act) or “Katie Beckett” option, children with significant medical expenses get Medicaid coverage for home and community-based care, regardless of their family’s income. A child must meet the disability definitions of either the SSI or Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) programs and be cared for at home."

"In 2002, the following states used the TEFRA option:"

"Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New, Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin."

Source:  http://www.familiesusa.org/assets/pdfs/screening-manual/3_Ch ildren-and-Familiies.pdf

Even though the above list is from 2002, it might be still fairly current -- a 2007 manual listed the number of Katie Beckett states as still about 20.

For an up-to-date list of various Medicaid waivers, go here.  However, they might not necessarily use the term "Katie Beckett."

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/MedicaidStWaivProgDemoPGI/08_WavMap.a sp

If anyone knows of a better list, by all means share it!

In Pennsylvania, children with disabilities can qualify for free services through the state. There's a fair amount of paperwork to complete each year, but kids can get services called "wrap around." We used these services for our son, and found inconsistency in how well therapists were trained. Some were fantastic and others were not. "Wrap around" cannot provide ABA. It can also take a while to get these services since they are in high demand. [QUOTE=NorwayMom]

I thought I might as well bump this topic again, since I wanted to add my link to state-by-state information on Medicaid waivers, often known as Katie Beckett.

First off, a short explanation for those unfamiliar with Katie Beckett:

"Called the TEFRA (Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act) or “Katie Beckett” option, children with significant medical expenses get Medicaid coverage for home and community-based care, regardless of their family’s income. A child must meet the disability definitions of either the SSI or Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) programs and be cared for at home."

"In 2002, the following states used the TEFRA option:"

"Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New, Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin."

Source:  http://www.familiesusa.org/assets/pdfs/screening-manual/3_Ch ildren-and-Familiies.pdf

Even though the above list is from 2002, it might be still fairly current -- a 2007 manual listed the number of Katie Beckett states as still about 20.

For an up-to-date list of various Medicaid waivers, go here.  However, they might not necessarily use the term "Katie Beckett."

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/MedicaidStWaivProgDemoPGI/08_WavMap.a sp

[/QUOTE]

 

Thanks for getting that.  I am wondering what it means that they must be cared for at home....what if the chid is school age?  People go to a clinic to get treatment and I wonder how they get to pick and choose the therapies and hours.  Also, in some states like Idaho the more sever get IBI (under the waver) which is more one on one I was told. 

I think "cared for at home" means that the child cannot be in an institutional or group home setting. 

I thought I might as well bump this topic again, since I wanted to add my link to state-by-state information on Medicaid waivers, often known as Katie Beckett.

First off, a short explanation for those unfamiliar with Katie Beckett:

"Called the TEFRA (Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act) or “Katie Beckett” option, children with significant medical expenses get Medicaid coverage for home and community-based care, regardless of their family’s income. A child must meet the disability definitions of either the SSI or Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) programs and be cared for at home."

"In 2002, the following states used the TEFRA option:"

"Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New, Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin."

Source:  http://www.familiesusa.org/assets/pdfs/screening-manual/3_Ch ildren-and-Familiies.pdf

Even though the above list is from 2002, it might be still fairly current -- a 2007 manual listed the number of Katie Beckett states as still about 20.

For an up-to-date list of various Medicaid waivers, go here.  However, they might not necessarily use the term "Katie Beckett."

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/MedicaidStWaivProgDemoPGI/08_WavMap.a sp

Maine offers the Katie Beckett still, the forms are on  my desk......Texas just calls it the waiver program.  We've quite a waiting list.  My 10 yo is number 20 thousand something on the list now.  Better than 35 thousand something.
 

Copyright Autism-PDD.net