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DevPed says not autistic School Yes?????

I am an education major (almost done) and mommy of an ASD kid.  Personally, I would hang on to the school's "label" because it does allow him alot of wiggle room when it comes to getting help.  With the school label, you can get as much or as little help as he needs.  Just because they label him doesn't mean he has to be in a special education class.  It may end up that a regular ed teacher could better accommodate him in class.  Without the label, the teacher's hands are legally tied and she won't be able to provide the best opportunity for him to learn.  And that label doesn't necessarily stick with him for life either.  My son is very high functioning and we anticipate him eventually not being classified in the school system at all.

Bottom line:  at this young age, if they are behind at all, they really need to be getting all the help they can get.  Once they get older, it is much harder to catch up, plus they begin to get a social stigma of being "labeled" special ed.  In Kindergarten, kids don't know what any of that means.  By labeling him autistic in his IEP, the school can basically give him any help they have available.  My daughter is technically labeled Special Ed, but only for a speech disorder.  If she ever needs any help beyond what they speech pathologist can give her, we will have to go through an entire evaluation. 

I wouldn't get too wrapped up in the label.  It really isn't a bad thing.

[QUOTE=MissKim]KD-my sons school basically ignored me too until I pushed, and had a team meeting and then they changed his school Dx to autism for sake of getting him services he needs. Also, my friends 4 year old was Dx Autistic by a Doc, and the preschool will not recognize it either, but he is on their radar. Hopefully once your son is in kinde. they will change his dx in school so he can get more services, just keep pushing, seriously, it really is a pain, but so are schools! [/QUOTE]


I just took him back to Kaiser ASD after a year and he is barely on the spectrum now.  He has made so much improvement.  He had 3 areas of the 12 marked.  Last year he had 4. They completely dropped the repetive language area which I agree with.  He doesn't have the echolalia anymore.  For the school he actually probably wouldn't even qualify for speech anymore if they retested him.  I do want more social stuff addressed because the dev. ped and psychologist said his social communication looks to be about a year behind.  His adaptives got better in 9 out of 10 areas from his evaluation last year.  For both me and the teacher his General Adaptive Composite came out 84 (me) 83 (teacher) which puts that below average.  I scored him lowest in social, self-care and motor while the teacher had him scored lowest in social, communication and self-care.  His best skills on mine were functional pre-academics, communication (obviously way better at home than school) and home living.  The teacher scored him highest in health/safety, self-direciton and school living.

I go back and forth because he is doing so well but he is only 4 and they said that while he is progressing great, they do want to at least wait until kindergarten before they consider dropping the dx (I asked about dropping it because we get nothing out of it besides the negative of it being in his records) because of that social piece still being a year behind.
We do not agree with the autism diagnosis that was given by the school to our son.  The developmental pediatrician says that he DOES NOT meet the necessary criteria for that diagnosis but the say they can use their own diagnosis for academic purposes if they so choose.  He qualifies for his speech/language therapy based on the Language Disorder diagnosis our developmental pediatrician tested and provided but they seem determined on putting a label on him for whatever reason.I see what you are talking about, I just mean maybe the school thinks he will get better services with that label. From my side, I had to fight to even get my son eval. and I knew something was wrong. Was just stating your son could possibly benefit from that label in a school setting so he could get the best services for his language delay. -not tryin to push, sorry. A label is just that, nothing more. It does not make your child, but could help him in school. But, if you disagree I do not believe your school can do what they please. Just push them if you really dont want the label on him, only way to get schools to listen sometimes.

     How is your child doing?  How is he developmentally?  Is he age apropriate?  How is his behavior?  Would he be able to learn well and meet his potential in a reg. ed classroom?  These are the questions that matter in placement.  Look up Norwaymom's placement resources, that would help you better understand what is best for your child.  Try not to go on a warring path with the school if you can help it.  Goodluck.

Concernedpa.

Just a few months ago, my dev. pedi put Sean under "possible asperger's" dx, even though he has no symptoms/trigger-signs of aspergers/asd. I found out yesterday that, he put that on there so Sean would be placed in the appropriate classes, due to how the middle school and high school run things in our district with services. However, he based the possible dx on a geneticist finding the "asperger's gene" during the newest work up last year. However, there is not one single symptom that Sean has that even remotely shows him to be in the spectrum (all his symptoms, after research of SD, are right on with that dx).

If you feel your child is being placed in the wrong setting, you have the right to fight for whatever you feel he needs. I had toured the autism classrooms here, and before we moved, I had seen them back home--as well as mainstream surroundings with para involvement, prior to my meetings. If you can do this, and also speak to the teachers that work in both, prior to any meetings, I would recommend you do so. That way, you have a better understanding of what to do and not to do when it comes to the proper setting for your child.

I refused one placement with Taylor. It didn't go over well and they didn't agree with me but, I held out strong and, finally, they came up to me to avoid mediation costs, and let me do whatever it was I felt was right with my child. In the long run, it was the best fight I ever did and I continue the fight, even now with Sean, since he is in the middle school and classrooms are based on different guidelines by their standards.

 

Ben is doing well.  His language is becoming conversational and he is less than a year behind in language now.  All his motor skills are fine and they are going to reccommend him to be in a general classroom with pull out for speech.  They agree with us that all his symptoms do point towards a language disorder but they want to keep an autism diag anyway.  At his ARD we asked for specifics on their concerns and nothing they gave us points towards ASD at all.  They just seem to be on an agenda to do what they want regardless.  His initial eval several years ago went poorly and that is where the ASD diag came from.  We've pushed to re-eval but they won't guarantee it can be done before the kindergarten transition team makes its decisions so all the information in the old report will remain in effect which does not creat an accurate account of who is today now that his language etc. is catching up.We have no ASD diagnosis from the Drs. All of them. So that pretty much cut off all services.  Now I believe the reason is that my son, one on one, can test out of all markers. In school, however, he has a lot of symptoms. I wanted support for him so I went with the school's recommendations. It just gave him extra support.  My two cents, make sure you are separating what emotions you are feeling to what the school has to offer. He is very young and may really blossom with the extra services they offer. Have you visitied with the school and asked them how their services are carried out? 

The school, depending on the state can get FAR more funding for an autism DX.

Also, educational autism is sometimes interpreted as a discrepancy among learning domains, also known as "scatter."

On the other hand some Dev. Peds have differing philosophies as to what "autism" is.

I do not envy you this situation.  We did not get a clinical dx and  Iam glad we did not try.

 

I have learned on here that there is a difference between an educational dx and medical.  I have the opposite problem.  My 4 year old has a medical dx of mild PDDNOS but he did not meet criteria for an educational dx. KD-my sons school basically ignored me too until I pushed, and had a team meeting and then they changed his school Dx to autism for sake of getting him services he needs. Also, my friends 4 year old was Dx Autistic by a Doc, and the preschool will not recognize it either, but he is on their radar. Hopefully once your son is in kinde. they will change his dx in school so he can get more services, just keep pushing, seriously, it really is a pain, but so are schools!

    Ask them to let him start in the least restrictive environment which is a reg. ed classroom and then you can sit down and have another meeting after he has been in there for a month to discuss how he is doing, if it it the apropriate placement and if he needs just supports to meet his needs in there.  I will look for the placements considerations I refered to earlier to help you decide.  Goodluck.

Concernedpa

For autism to be the classification in school, there needs to be NO medical diagnosis.ALl that needs to happen is for the child to meet the criteria for educational autism under the classification.  Ask that your IEP Team review the educational definition with you.  I often hear the OPPPOSITE tale. The Dr. says, yes ASD.  The school says no.  Many doctors use the terms asd and autism interchangeably, meaning that they do not think of PDD-NOS or Aspergers' when they hear ASD.  For school purposes, PDD-NOS and Asperger's do qualify under the educational definition of autism. 

The law does not require the IEP Team to implement recommendations from a doctor. Ever.  It requires them to listen and "consider."  That is all. 

Our developmental pediatrician says that our son definately does not meet the criteria for an ASD but the school says that they plan to use their own diagnosis.  Is this legal can they just disregard a doctors report and run their own agenda no matter what?  He is transitioning to kindergarten for next year and we want him to go with his Language Disorder Diagnosis given by our dev ped (which by the way the school reccommended) but they seem determined not to accept that at all.  Where does that leave us?  Does anyone know what our options are legally?i dont understand were school think they all of a sudden no more then a dr ,if there willing to give him all these severe great .but why are they insting he has autism when it a speech dealy .do you agree with the dr .you can all ways go for second opp if your not sureI know if they get "labeled" a child with autism in school, they can get more help that way. Its not necessarily a bad thing, I pushed for them to chang my sons to that for his Diagnosis so he could get all the help he needed without all the extra questions. Hes Dx PDD-NOS, but for schools sake he needed the autism Dx. Its better to get more services then less than u need, trust me..You can always try to change it later when he no longer needs services.-just a thought.It essentially boils down to funds that the school will get. I think, you have to push only for speech delay since I believe, having my son diagnosed with autism, it is a never ending fight about this and that once a diagnosis of autism came about.  My son wasn't diagnosed with autism until he was 11, but we wanted all the ASD interventions he could get. We knew something wasn't right. Doctors are often wrong when the kids are younger. ASD kids DO improve; in kindergarten our school wanted to do the opposite--say he was "just a normal kid." He lost all his interventions and we went along with it because his professionals said he had "outgrown any autistic symptoms." ASD is not mostly about talking or motor skills. It's about how well the kids can relate to others. We didn't see a big deficit with Mark when he was young because "playing" is so subjective then--it can be running around together. As he got older, we saw that he really didn't know how to have a give-and-take conversation or how to have an emotional-based friendship and he started to fall behind, not just there but also in school. Yet "everyone" said he didn't fit the criteria for ASD. We finally took him to a NeuroPsych because the older he got, t he more we saw, and he got the PDD-NOS dx. (which has been upgraded to Aspergers). He really took off after the diagnosis as far as school and academics because he then qualified for interventions. It is totally up to you, but imo I don't think interventions will hurt him. You don't know what lies ahead. This same Dev. Pediatrician could say "OH! Yeah, he DOES have ASD" in three years. And then your son  missed out. I would take the help--he had a speech delay--something isn't completely right. My son's first diagnosis was speech delay, sensory issues, cognitive disorder NOS. Mark no longer has a speech delay--his vocabulary isn't behind at all. But he does have social "cluelessness" and he IS on the Spectrum. Whatever you decide to do, good luck. [QUOTE=tzoya]

The law does not require the IEP Team to implement recommendations from a doctor. Ever.  It requires them to listen and "consider."  That is all. 

[/QUOTE]

We are in this position.  We have four outside evaluators writing reports all saying my son is on the spectrum, and should qualify for services.  And everyone else who has worked with him says so verbally.  But we have one school psychologist who has not read the outside reports telling us that my son does not qualify for services.  And the school psych trumps the outside evaluations.

Lawyer say that this is legal.  I think that the next step is an IEE (Independent Educational Evaluation see Wright's Law web site) and then a due process hearing.  But we will follow the lawyer's advice.
Dad2Luke&Alan39773.5768055556

[QUOTE=kdchaos]I have learned on here that there is a difference between an educational dx and medical.  I have the opposite problem.  My 4 year old has a medical dx of mild PDDNOS but he did not meet criteria for an educational dx. [/QUOTE]

 

Thats us too - he has PDD nos and extreme sensory dysfunction but the school is classifying him under ED.

 

 

 

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